BRAGI Group Featured by Pattern Magazine

PATTERN magazine is an award-winning independent biannual fashion , art and culture magazine with carefully curated content featuring new and already established talent in America’s Heartland. Catering to a global sophisticated audience, it is a luxurious, over-sized, collectible publication containing full page spreads focused on illustration and graphic design, vibrant fashion editorials, exclusive interviews and a different city focus in each issue.

Q + A with Abir and Claudia Haque of the Bragi Group

Q + A With Claudia and Abir Haque of BRAGI Group

BRAGI Group offers an array of services that are specifically focused on the fashion industry. Pattern Magazine had a chat with Abir and his wife Claudia to learn more about their business, and how it fits with Indy’s growing apparel sector.

Brooke Tichenor: Can you share more about your company and the types of products and services you specialize in?

Abir Haque:  At the core of our company is our family-owned factories in Southeast Asia and the Middle East, which have been in operation for over two decades.  We act on behalf of the factories by communicating directly with the client. We cut out the middleman and the middleman costs entirely.

We offer design and manufacturing services to our clients.  On the design side, we provide clothing/textile and pattern design, brand development, digital marketing and e-commerce, website design, packaging and print. On the manufacturing side is the production of apparel as well as logistics and distribution.  We offer direct manufacturing where we source the clothes, trims, and accessories and then we put it together.  And, in June of this year, we also expanded to selling wholesale products and apparel.

Essentially, our company brings large-scale apparel manufacturing operations to buyers here in the United States. Our entire operations from our corporate office to our centralized warehouses is right here in Indianapolis.

BT: How did the Bragi Group come to be?

Claudia Haque:  We noticed that the business model of having intermediary agents between customers and apparel factories was becoming obsolete, yet there was still a big gap to filled by the overseas factories, in terms of establishing and having their own offices in the United States.

Through the trade shows we attended, and the designers we talked to, it became increasingly apparent there was this need to fill – and we noticed there were few operations out there like this.  So, to us, the idea of being one of the few pioneers was attractive. It just made sense to bring everything here instead of the other way around.

BT: What types of clothing do you specialize in?

AH: We do tops, bottoms, jackets, and outerwear, and we specialize in denim. We provide a range of products for men’s, women’s and children’s lines.

BT: You mentioned you began selling wholesale apparel in June. What attracted you to wholesale?

AH:  We saw a need with the clients that we were servicing.  For example, a client hires us to manufacture a piece of clothing they designed themselves – once it goes to production, it can take anywhere from a month to several months to complete, depending on the size and scale of the project. Our clients are often faced with the dilemma of what to do during this waiting period, as they need to continue to sell and earn a living.

We offer the designer an opportunity to look through our wholesale products and if something aligns with their brand, they can take advantage of that immediately.  If a client purchases a wholesale product, they have the option to making it their own by replacing the Bragi label with their own private label, and adding a unique graphic or embellishment.

We saw a need with the clients that we were servicing.  For example, a client hires us to manufacture a piece of clothing they designed themselves – once it goes to production, it can take anywhere from a month to several months to complete, depending on the size and scale of the project. Our clients are often faced with the dilemma of what to do during this waiting period, as they need to continue to sell and earn a living.

Written By Brooke Tichenor

Photography by Corey Nxght